Reflection #5

Reflection #5 © Matt Lemon Photography. All Rights Reserved.
Lost in thought at St. George Ferry Terminal. Staten Island, New York. © Matt Lemon Photography. All Rights Reserved.
“We must find time to stop and thank the people who make a difference in our lives.” ― John F. Kennedy

MV John F. Kennedy

The Staten Island Ferry is the only direct mass-transit connection between the New York City boroughs of Manhattan and Staten Island. Ferry boats make the 5.2 miles (8.4 km)  trip through New York Harbor in approximately 25 minutes, 24 hours a day, 7 days a week. There are eight ferry boats currently in service, from four classes—Kennedy, Barberi, Austen, and Molinari.

The Staten Island Ferry’s MV John F. Kennedy belongs to the Kennedy class and was built by the Levingston Shipbuilding Company in Orange, Texas, in 1965. Its two sister ships, MV American Legion II and MV Governor Herbert H. Lehman, were retired in 2006 and 2007, respectively, and only the John F. Kennedy remains in service as a favorite of both passengers and ferry operators. Captains consider her to be the most reliable vessel in the fleet, and riders prefer her abundant open-air deck space.

The John F. Kennedy is currently planned to be retired in 2020, along with the two Barberi-class ferries. These three vessels will be replaced by a new trio of ferries, collectively known as the Ollis-class. The design of this new class will be heavily influenced by the John F. Kennedy, featuring her distinctive outdoor promenades and extended foredecks. In October 2018, the timeline for the Ollis-class ferries’ delivery was pushed back as some of the parts were being manufactured at Eastern Shipbuilding’s shipyard in Panama City, Florida, which had been severely damaged after Hurricane Michael.

Designed by Seattle-based Elliott Bay Design Group, the Ollis Class is named in honor of Staff Sgt. Michael Ollis, a native Staten Islander who was killed at age 24 protecting a Polish soldier from an explosion in 2013 during his third deployment to Iraq and Afghanistan.

All Reflections on Matt Lemon Photography

 

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